Canada legalises sale and use of marijuana

Canada has become the second country after Uruguay to legalise possession and use of recreational cannabis.

The nationwide market for cannabis opened on Wednesday at midnight amid lingering questions about the impact on health, the law and public safety.

Information has been sent to 15m households about the new laws and public awareness campaigns.

But there remain concerns, including about the readiness for police forces to tackle drug impaired driving.

Uruguay was the first country to legalise recreational marijuana, although Portugal and the Netherlands have decriminalised the drug.

Canadian provinces and municipalities have been preparing for months for the end of cannabis prohibition.

Provinces and territories are responsible for setting out many of the details for where cannabis can be bought and consumed within their jurisdictions.

This has created a patchwork of legislation across the country as jurisdictions choose more or less restrictive frameworks for selling and using cannabis.

Shops in the province of Newfoundland, the most easterly time zone in Canada, opened as midnight struck for the first legal sales of cannabis in the country.

There remain unanswered questions on some key issues around how legal cannabis will work in Canada.

A number of analysts are predicting a shortage of recreational marijuana in the first year of legalisation as production and licensing continues to ramp up to meet demand.

And the marketplace itself is still in its infancy.

Ontario, Canada’s most populous province, will only begin opening retail stores next spring, though residents will be able to order cannabis online.

British Columbia, one of the provinces with the highest rates of cannabis use, will only have one legal store open on Wednesday.

Until retail locations are more widely available, some unlicensed cannabis retailers, which have flourished in the years since the law was first proposed, may stay open.

It is unclear if police will crack down on them immediately, or if they will turn a blind eye.

Legal pot has been an inescapable topic for months in Canada, as governments and companies prepare in earnest for 17 October.

That day is finally here, and Canadians will learn just how much – or how little – the new framework will change the country. But this is not just a domestic affair.

With global trends shifting away from a strict prohibition of cannabis, the world will be watching this national experiment in drug liberalisation.

A measure of success – whether legalisation will be a win for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ahead of the 2019 federal election – will depend on whether it meets his stated goals: restricting access of the drug to youth – who are among the heaviest users in Canada – reducing the burden of cannabis laws on the justice system, and undercutting the illicit market for the drug.

And if the outcomes are positive, other countries might just be more willing to follow suit.

Legalisation fulfils a 2015 campaign promise by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the leader of the governing Liberal Party.

The prime minister has argued that Canada’s nearly century-old laws criminalising use of the drug have been ineffective, given that Canadians are still among the world’s heaviest users.

He said the new law is designed to keep drugs out of the hands of minors and profits out of the hands of criminals.

The federal government also predicts it will raise $400m a year in tax revenues on the sale of cannabis.

Cannabis possession first became a crime in Canada in 1923 but medical use has been legal since 2001.

Canada follows in the footsteps of Uruguay, which became the first country in the world to legalise the sale of cannabis for recreational use in 2013. A number of US states have also voted to end prohibition.

Medical marijuana is also gaining ground in many European countries.

Adults will be able buy cannabis oil, seeds and plants and dried cannabis from licensed producers and retailers and to possess up to 30 grams (one ounce) of dried cannabis in public, or its equivalent.

Edibles, or cannabis-infused foods, will not be immediately available for purchase but will be within a year of the bill coming into force. The delay is meant to give the government time to set out regulations specific to those products.

It will be illegal to possess more than 30 grams in public, grow more than four plants per household and to buy from an unlicensed dealer.

Penalties for some infraction will be severe. Someone caught selling the drug to a minor could be jailed for up to 14 years.

Some critics say the penalties are too harsh and not proportional to similar laws like those around selling alcohol to minors.

What are some concerns once it is legal?

The end of prohibition will not mean an end to legal and health concerns regarding marijuana.

On Monday, the Canadian Medical Association Journal published an editorial calling legalisation “a national, uncontrolled experiment in which the profits of cannabis producers and tax revenues are squarely pitched against the health of Canadians”.

There are also still some legal wrinkles to be worked out.

Canada has brought in new drug impaired driving offences, but doubts remain about the reliability of screening technology and the potential for drugged driving cases to clog up the courts.

Federal statistics indicate that about half of all cannabis users do not believe their driving is impaired after taking marijuana.

Government officials told reporters on Tuesday that they are currently considering a fast-track process to allow people who have been convicted of possession to apply for legal pardons. There are currently some 500,000 Canadians with existing criminal records for possession.

The change in national drug policy has also created headaches with the US, where the drug remains federally a controlled substance.

On Tuesday, the US Customs Border Protection Agency said border guards will have “broad latitude” to determine who is admissible to the country.

Border guards may ask Canadians if they smoke pot, and deny them entry if they believe they intend to do so in the US.

Canada has also been rolling out signs at all airports and border crossings to warn travellers that crossing international borders with the drug remains illegal.

 

BBC

Saudi crown prince ‘denies knowledge’ of missing critic

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The US Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, met the crown prince in Riyadh on Tuesday

Saudi Arabia’s powerful Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman has denied knowing what happened to the missing Saudi journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, according to President Donald Trump.

Saudi Arabia being blamed was a case of “guilty until proven innocent”, Mr Trump told the AP news agency.

Unnamed Turkish officials say a search of the Istanbul Saudi consulate gave more evidence Mr Khashoggi was killed.

The issue has put Saudi Arabia under pressure from close allies.

The journalist, a critic of the Saudi leadership, was last seen alive entering the consulate on 2 October. Saudi Arabia has denied killing him and initially said he left the building unharmed.

What has Prince Mohammed said?

The Saudi heir apparent wields considerable power in the kingdom and is being held responsible by many outside for whatever happened to Mr Khashoggi.

Mr Trump tweeted that Prince Mohammed had spoken to him on the phone and he “totally denied any knowledge of what took place in their Turkish Consulate”.

The president said he “told me that he has already started, and will rapidly expand, a full and complete investigation into this matter. Answers will be forthcoming shortly”.

The phone call coincided with a visit to Saudi Arabia by US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, sent there by Mr Trump to deal with the crisis in relations.

On Monday, Mr Trump speculated that “rogue killers” may have been behind the journalist’s disappearance.

In a further sign of disquiet within the US, a leading Republican senator and defender of US-Saudi links, Lindsey Graham, has been highly critical of the Saudi crown prince.

“This guy’s gotta go,” he said on Tuesday morning on Fox News, describing Prince Mohammed as a “wrecking ball”.

Presentational grey line

Reputations may be forever tainted

By Frank Gardner, BBC News

The recent, highly charged exchange of words between Washington and Riyadh now appears to have given way to a mutual search for the least bad explanation. Both countries’ leaders know they have an enormous amount to lose if this affair ends up splitting apart their 73-year-old strategic partnership.

Iran, as the regional rival to Saudi Arabia, would be the prime beneficiary if the Saudis were to lose their defensive US umbrella. President Trump is also correct when he says thousands of US jobs would be lost, with China and Russia to be among those lining up to replace them.

Which begs the wider question: is the West’s relationship with Saudi Arabia so important that it outweighs the need to condemn and punish what many believe was a state-sponsored murder of a journalist inside a consulate?

Hence the urgent dispatching of the US secretary of state for talks with the Saudi leadership. In private there may well be some strong words, in public both countries may want to present a united stand. But one thing is certain: whatever narrative emerges, the international reputation of the Saudi crown prince and power-behind-the-throne Mohammed Bin Salman will forever be tainted by this affair.

Presentational grey line

What is the state of investigation?

A search was due to be conducted on Tuesday of the consul’s residence, some 200 metres away from the consulate.

But that has now been delayed because no Saudi official can be present for what has been billed as a joint investigation, Turkish officials say.

The consul, Mohammad al-Otaibi, left Turkey on a commercial flight bound for Saudi Arabia earlier in the day.

On the day of Mr Khashoggi’s disappearance, several vehicles with Saudi diplomatic number plates were seen on video footage moving from the consulate to the residence.

Meanwhile, Turkish investigators quoted by two news agencies say Monday’s search of the consulate has yielded more evidence that Mr Khashoggi was killed there.

Turkish forensic police arrive to search the Saudi consul's residence in Istanbul following the disappearance of Saudi journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, 16 October 2018Image copyrightEPA

Image captionThe investigation has moved to the consul’s residence

A Turkish official is quoted by Reuters as saying “strong evidence” was found but no conclusive proof.

Turkish security sources have long made clear they have audio evidence pointing to his murder.

The search of the consulate continued into the early hours of Tuesday. Samples, including soil from the garden and a metal gate, were reportedly taken.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told reporters the investigation “was looking into many things such as toxic materials and those materials being removed by painting them over”.

The New York Times and CNN, quoting unnamed sources, reported on Monday that Saudi Arabia would acknowledge that Mr Khashoggi’s death was the result of an interrogation that went wrong.

What is alleged to have happened at the consulate?

Media captionCCTV footage shows missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Mr Khashoggi, who has written for the Washington Post and is a US resident, arrived at the consulate at 13:14 local time on 2 October to obtain paperwork so he could marry his Turkish fiancée, Hatice Cengiz.

Reports suggest an assault and struggle took place in the building.

Turkish sources allege he was killed by a 15-strong team of Saudi agents pictured entering and leaving Turkey on CCTV footage released to media outlets.

There are allegations in Turkish media that his body was dismembered in the building.

Mr Khashoggi was once an adviser to the Saudi royal family but fell out of favour with the country’s rulers and went into self-imposed exile.

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Ethiopia’s PM gives half of ministerial posts to women

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Aisha Mohammed was construction minister before becoming Ethiopia’s first defence minister

Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has appointed women to half of his government’s ministerial posts, including the job of defence minister.

Explaining his decision in a speech to Parliament, Mr Abiy said women were “less corrupt than men” and would help restore peace and stability.

Ethiopia is now the only African state after Rwanda to have equal gender representation in the cabinet.

Mr Abiy also cut the number of ministerial jobs from 28 to 20.

Since becoming prime minister in April, he has carried numerous massive reforms.

He has ended two decades of conflict with neighbouring Eritrea, released thousands of political prisoners and loosened the state’s tight grip on parts of the economy.

Aisha Mohammed was named as Ethiopia’s first female defence minister. She is from the country’s Afar region in the north-east, and had served as construction minister.

Muferiat Kamil, the former speaker of parliament, became the country’s first Minister of Peace. She will be overseeing the country’s intelligence and security apparatus, including the federal police.

Mahlet Hailu, Ethiopia’s deputy permanent representative to the UN, tweeted the list of new ministers:

Twitter post by @HailuMahlet: 50% Femmes!!!. Maintien de la parité de genre au sein du remaniement du gouvernement du Premier Ministre de l’ #Ethiopie. Un nouveau elan pour délivrer les reformes .. Image Copyright @HailuMahlet@HAILUMAHLET

Report

Mr Abiy said that his reform process needed to continue to address the structural and strategic problems that pushed the country into chaos.

He said women had made a great contribution to restoring peace and stability, were less corrupt, respected their work and could sustain the drive for change.

Abiy Ahmed in August 2018Image copyrightREUTERS

Image captionAbiy Ahmed has made huge changes in the six months he has been in office

The 42-year-old became prime minister in April after the unexpected resignation of Hailemariam Desalegn.

It followed three years of protest led by ethnic Oromos, who were demanding an end to what they considered their political and economic marginalization.

Mr Abiy is Oromo himself, but his appeal for trust and unity to “heal our wounds… and work together to develop our country” has received a cautious welcome from many within Ethiopia

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Nehanda, the Shona spirit medium that inspired Mugabe

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Nehanda Nyakasikana was a Shona spirit medium who led the fight against the British colonisers in what is now Zimbabwe in the 19th Century.

She took her name from the spirit which possessed her and it gave her great status among her people.

She became a spiritual, political and military leader of the Shona people.

She refused to convert to Christianity when she was sentenced to death by the British, promising her bones would rise up and continue the fight.

Nehanda Nyakasikana is the next of a new eight-part series, African Women who Changed the World, which aims to shed light on great African women whose stories deserve to be heard.

This BBC Africa series has been produced using historical and iconographic research, but includes artistic interpretation.

Illustrations: George Wafula

Producer and editor: Kat Hawkins

Extra images: Getty Images

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British-Nigerian filmmaker Adeyemi Michael: all immigrants are conquerors

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British-Nigerian Filmmaker Adeyemi Michael discusses his short film Entitled, a “fantasy documentary”, which he describes as a re-imagining of the first-generation immigrant experience.

The film, which is being screened this week at the 2018 BFI London Film Festival, shows Adeyemi’s mum riding a black stallion down a busy high street in South London.

His mother had never ridden a horse before shooting the film, in which she is dressed in the traditional regalia of the Yoruba ethnic group.

Video producer: Rupert Waring

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Nigeria midwife murders: Brutal IS tactics rekindle new fears

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Hauwa Liman

Image copyright
ICRC/EPA

Image caption

Hauwa Liman’s colleagues say she was “truly dedicated to her work helping vulnerable women”

The execution-style killings of two Muslim midwives in north-eastern Nigeria have raised fears that the Islamist insurgency is far from over.

The Islamic State (IS) group and the political tensions ahead of elections in Africa’s most-populous nation are being blamed for the upsurge in violence this year.

Hauwa Liman and Saifura Ahmed Khorsa both worked for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) when they were kidnapped along with another female aid worker from the town of Rann in March.

Fighters from a Boko Haram faction loyal to IS – known as the Islamic State West Africa Province (Iswap) – were behind their abduction.

Ms Khorsa, 25, was shot dead in September and a month later Ms Liman, her 24-year-old colleague, was also murdered.

Local journalists who have seen the two videos released by the jihadists after the killings say the women, wearing white hijabs, were forced to kneel down with their hands tied.

They were then shot from behind at close range.

Schoolgirl in captivity

It is not clear what demands the militants were making – but whatever they were the group says the government ignored them.

Iswap, which is believed to receive instructions from IS headquarters, has raised its profile this year and was behind the kidnapping of 110 schoolgirls from the town of Dapchi in February.

Most of the girls were released after a month, except for a 15-year-old who has reportedly refused to convert to Islam and remains in captivity.

Iswap appears to be the dominant Boko Haram faction since a split in the leadership of the group emerged in August 2016.

More on life amid Boko Haram:

Boko Haram launched its insurgency nearly nine years ago taking over large swathes of land in north-eastern Nigeria where it declared an Islamic caliphate.

Its leader, Abubakar Shekau, gained worldwide notoriety five years later after kidnapping more than 200 schoolgirls from Chibok.

In the wake of this, Shekau’s fighters joined IS, but it appears to have been a fractious relationship.

IS sacked him two years ago replacing him with Abu Musab al-Barnawi.

Image copyright
AFP/Boko Haram

Image caption

Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau pledged allegiance to IS in 2015

Many analysts believe Shekau – who is now rumoured to be ill – was removed because of the tactics he used, often sending child suicide bombers to launch indiscriminate attacks on civilians that included targeting places of worship.

Over the last five years, most areas under the militants’ control have been recaptured, though the two factions have continued to carry out attacks.

Gun-mounted trucks

But IS’ influence is becoming more visible – and security analyst Abdullahi Yalwa believes some of Iswap’s insurgents are possibly being trained at IS camps outside the country.

Image copyright
AFP

Image caption

Both Boko Haram factions continue to carry out attacks – this market was blown up in September

Iswap has been behind several daring and deadly attacks against the military in the last four months.

They brazenly drive in convoy in gun-mounted trucks to target soldiers in an apparent attempt to acquire more weapons and armoured vehicles.

The reticent military has not commented much on the attacks, except to say they were “fierce”.

Many observers believe the authorities are cautious about revealing the actual death toll for fear of demoralising soldiers fighting the insurgents.

It also puts in doubt a key campaign promise made by President Muhammadu Buhari when he came to power in 2015 that he would defeat Boko Haram.

And there are now growing concerns about security in Nigeria ahead of elections due in February when Mr Buhari will be seeking a second term in office.

Mr Yalwa says Boko Haram attacks are motivated by three factors:

  • Business – those involved using it as means of earning a living
  • Ideological – militants participating because of religious indoctrination
  • Political – militants who are allegedly paid to fuel violence by some politicians in an attempt to discredit those in power.

He adds that with thousands of people displaced by the conflict yet to return to their communities, security is increasingly becoming a key campaign issue.

‘Soft commander killed’

The two factions operate in different parts of the north-east.

Shekau’s group is active mainly around Sambisa Forest – where some of the Chibok girls were mainly thought to be held – and other areas bordering Cameroon.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Iswap gunmen raided the school in Dapchi in February to abduct more than 100 girls

Iswap is based around the Nigerian border with Niger, although they both move around the Lake Chad area.

After the split, there were reportedly deadly clashes between the factions, which has helped the military’s cause.

Within Iswap there are also reported tensions.

It is believed a top commander in that group, Mamman Nur, was killed by his close lieutenants in the wake of the release of the Dapchi girls.

There is a suspicion that he unilaterally ordered the release of some of schoolgirls without any ransom payment.

According to the respected Daily Trust newspaper, this “soft approach” could not be tolerated and he was killed on 21 August.

If he is dead, it could explain the group’s more hard-line approach in the last two months – and the murders of aid workers, reminiscent of IS tactics in the Middle East.

Mr Yalwa says the involvement of IS makes the insurgency more tactical, technical and complicated.

“Extra military intelligence and experience” is needed to make the security forces more proactive, he says.

Defence Minister Mansur Muhammad Dan-Ali is more upbeat, saying the recruitment of more soldiers – 10,000 are being trained every year – and better equipment will win the day in the end.

Both the UK and US are giving military support – and the government hopes to start taking delivery of 12 Super Tucano jets from the US next year, he says.

But for the communities in the north-east it is like deja-vu – with the vicious cycle of violence unlikely to end any time soon as both the militants and the army step up their operations ahead of the election.

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Naby Keita: Liverpool midfielder set for scan after injury

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Keita suffered a back injury against Napoli earlier this month but returned for Liverpool’s game against Manchester City before the international break

Liverpool midfielder Naby Keita will have a scan when he returns to the club after being injured playing for Guinea.

Keita hurt his hamstring in Tuesday’s 1-1 draw in Rwanda in an Africa Cup of Nations qualifier, reports Agence France Presse.

The 23-year-old has made 10 starts for the Reds since joining from RB Leipzig.

Keita is the fourth Reds player – along with Mohamed Salah, Sadio Mane and Virgil van Dijk – to be injured in the international break.

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Why Kim and Kanye meeting Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni was controversial

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Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionKanye West gives Yeezys to Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni

Kanye West is in East Africa at the moment recording new music.

But, along with his wife Kim Kardashian, he also took the opportunity to meet the president of Uganda, Yoweri Museveni.

The couple gave Mr Museveni a pair of Yeezy trainers – and even signed them (he asked if they were for playing football with).

But who is the 74-year-old leader, and why was it controversial for Kim and Kanye to meet him?

It all comes back to Trump

Image copyright
Getty Images

Mr Museveni is the second president Kanye has met in a week, after he spoke to Donald Trump on Thursday.

“It is an odd meeting,” says Dr Jonathan Fisher, who is an expert in African politics at the University of Birmingham.

“But President Museveni is known to be quite savvy with the media,” he says.

Dr Fisher thinks that meeting with Kim and Kanye is a way for Mr Museveni to put himself on Donald Trump’s radar – after all, we know Kanye and Trump get on.

The benefits to Uganda could come in the form of military training, arms and development money from the US if Mr Museveni gets in Trump’s good books.

‘Not a safe place for LGBT people’

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionGay rights campaigner Claire Byarugaba: “We would rather stay and fight but we know that people in power are way too powerful”

“Uganda is a dangerous place to be a gay person,” says Dr Fisher.

That’s also the case for other countries in the region but, in 2013, anti-homosexuality laws were toughened in Uganda.

Some MPs wanted to make homosexuality punishable by death.

“It luckily became more focused on life imprisonment, and that was eventually passed and signed by the president.”

The law also means you can go to prison for not reporting gay people to the authorities.

In the name of democracy

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Mr Museveni in 1986

President Museveni has been in power for 32 years.

In 1986, his National Resistance Movement took over the government, saying it wanted to introduce democracy to Uganda.

Instead, he banned political parties and said that anyone could run for office on their own.

But more than three decades later, he’s still in power – and it doesn’t look like he’s going anywhere.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Mr Museveni met Prince William at Kensington Palace earlier this month

“There’s been quite a violent response to opposition increasingly,” says Dr Fisher.

He says that recently there’s been “state security forces beating up opposition candidates, dispersing rallies”.

President Museveni has also changed the constitution in ways which have helped him stay in power.

He abolished a two-term president limit in 2005 so that he could run (and win) again.

And last year, he got rid of the age-limit for presidential candidates, which allows him to run again in the next few years.

What came out of the meeting

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Kim and Kanye also went on safari in Uganda

We’re not entirely sure why Kim and Kanye met Mr Museveni – or who instigated the meeting.

We do know that the president gave Kanye the Ugandan name “Kanyesigye”, which means “I trust”, and Kim was named “Kemigisha”, which means “the one with blessings from God”.

People magazine reported that Mr Museveni asked Kim what her job was, to which she politely replied that she had a reality show with her family.

We also know that Kanye said he “intends to put up a world class tourism school”, according to Mr Museveni.

According to TMZ, Ye even said the school was going to be like “like Jurassic Park”, and that he wants to make the country thrive “like Wakanda”.

Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

Listen to Newsbeat live at 12:45 and 17:45 every weekday on BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra – if you miss us you can listen back here.

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Ethiopia’s Abiy gives half of ministerial posts to women

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Aisha Mohammed, Ethiopia's new defence minister, arrives in Addis Ababa on 16 October 2018

Image copyright
AFP

Image caption

Aisha Mohammed was construction minister before becoming Ethiopia’s first defence minister

Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has appointed women to half of his government’s ministerial posts, including the job of defence minister.

Explaining his decision in a speech to Parliament, Mr Abiy said women were “less corrupt than men” and would help restore peace and stability.

Ethiopia is now the only African state after Rwanda to have equal gender representation in the cabinet.

Mr Abiy also cut the number of ministerial jobs from 28 to 20.

Since becoming prime minister in April, he has carried numerous massive reforms.

He has ended two decades of conflict with neighbouring Eritrea, released thousands of political prisoners and loosened the state’s tight grip on parts of the economy.

Aisha Mohammed was named as Ethiopia’s first female defence minister. She is from the country’s Afar region in the north-east, and had served as construction minister.

Muferiat Kamil, the former speaker of parliament, became the country’s first Minister of Peace. She will be overseeing the country’s intelligence and security apparatus, including the federal police.

Mahlet Hailu, Ethiopia’s deputy permanent representative to the UN, tweeted the list of new ministers:

Mr Abiy said that his reform process needed to continue to address the structural and strategic problems that pushed the country into chaos.

He said women had made a great contribution to restoring peace and stability, were less corrupt, respected their work and could sustain the drive for change.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Abiy Ahmed has made huge changes in the six months he has been in office

The 42-year-old became prime minister in April after the unexpected resignation of Hailemariam Desalegn.

It followed three years of protest led by ethnic Oromos, who were demanding an end to what they considered their political and economic marginalization.

Mr Abiy is Oromo himself, but his appeal for trust and unity to “heal our wounds… and work together to develop our country” has received a cautious welcome from many within Ethiopia.

More about Abiy’s impact:

Father reunited with long-lost daughters

Making peace with ‘Africa’s North Korea’

Behind the smiles of Eritrea’s president

Key facts about Ethiopia

You can now get the latest BBC news in Afaan Oromo, Amharic and Tigrinya.

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Africa Cup of Nations: Madagascar qualify for first ever finals

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Madagascar’s Njiva Rakotoharimalala plays his club football in Thailand

A goal fr0m Thailand-based Njiva Rakotoharimalala sent Madagascar to their first ever Africa Cup of Nations finals.

The 26-year-old midfielder scored the only goal of the game just before half-time as the Malagasy beat visiting Equatorial Guinea.

The result puts Madagascar on ten points in Group A to guarantee them a place in Cameroon next year.

Senegal will join them in the finals if they can win in Sudan later on Tuesday.

Madagascar become the 40th different nation to qualify for the Nations Cup finals.

There are two more qualifying rounds left to play one in November and the final matches will be in March next year.

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